December 5, 2013

Eighty years ago today, Prohibition ended. Time Inc. commemorates the occasion by revisiting its photos of speakeasies in the 1930s. The photos are a little more restrained and genteel than what I imagined speakeasies would be…they kind of look like modern day New York Sunday brunch, except with dressed-up people.

I love the originally-published intro to the photo essay (the photos were shot by Margaret Bourke-White), which describes why New York is way better than San Francisco and Chicago:

The speakeasy [FORTUNE told its readers, betraying a fair bit of patrician hauteur] has flowered successfully only in New York. In San Francisco it is dull and obscure; in Chicago, tough and noisy; in the South almost nonexistent. In most cities, drinking, like eating, is done at home or in the country club. In New York alone has the speakeasy become the instrument of a civilized social life, something between a pre-prohibition restaurant and a coeducational club. There are, therfore, in New York, speakeasies for every taste and purse… . The pictures on these pages present a fair cross-section of the reputable ones. They are probably the first pictures ever taken of speakeasies in action. They may be the last: no one can prophesy the future of these curious by-prodcuts of the post-War age if and when prohibition is repealed. If they survive it will be as restaurants with bars; locked doors will no longer spice the drinks. It is for a future that will want to know how New Yorkers of the ’20s lived that FORTUNE presents this portfolio of Margarte Bourke-White’s pictures.

Read more: Prohibition: Scenes From the Speakeasies of New York in 1933 | LIFE.com

(Source: (http)


Margaret Bourke-White— Caption from FORTUNE: "At luncheon half a dozen dogs feed amicably at their mistresses' side. This bar is chromium, rose and black."

Margaret Bourke-White—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

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November 22, 2012
An essay in the Times_: On Being Not Dead_


  I suppose it’s a cliché to say you’re glad to be alive, that life is short, but to say you’re glad to be not dead requires a specific intimacy with loss that comes only with age or deep experience. One has to know not simply what dying is like, but to know death itself, in all its absoluteness.
  After all, there are many ways to die — peacefully, violently, suddenly, slowly, happily, unhappily, too soon. But to be dead — one either is or isn’t.
  The same cannot be said of aliveness, of which there are countless degrees. One can be alive but half-asleep or half-noticing as the years fly, no matter how fully oxygenated the blood and brain or how steadily the heart beats. Fortunately, this is a reversible condition. One can learn to be alert to the extraordinary and press pause — to memorize moments of the everyday.


Read the rest of the essay by Bill Hayes

An essay in the Times_: On Being Not Dead_

I suppose it’s a cliché to say you’re glad to be alive, that life is short, but to say you’re glad to be not dead requires a specific intimacy with loss that comes only with age or deep experience. One has to know not simply what dying is like, but to know death itself, in all its absoluteness. After all, there are many ways to die — peacefully, violently, suddenly, slowly, happily, unhappily, too soon. But to be dead — one either is or isn’t. The same cannot be said of aliveness, of which there are countless degrees. One can be alive but half-asleep or half-noticing as the years fly, no matter how fully oxygenated the blood and brain or how steadily the heart beats. Fortunately, this is a reversible condition. One can learn to be alert to the extraordinary and press pause — to memorize moments of the everyday.

Read the rest of the essay by Bill Hayes

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October 18, 2012
Visitors at the 1939 World’s Fair in Queens visit “the City of Tomorrow”. Photograph by David E. Scherman for LIFE. Via the LIFE image archive at Google. Also, check out the LIFE tumblr for other amazing images from their iconic archive.

Visitors at the 1939 World’s Fair in Queens visit “the City of Tomorrow”. Photograph by David E. Scherman for LIFE. Via the LIFE image archive at Google. Also, check out the LIFE tumblr for other amazing images from their iconic archive.

September 5, 2012
During World War 2, New York dimmed its lights citywide to conserve energy. This is what the Statue of Liberty looks like when only her torch is alit.
Photo by Andreas Feininger for LIFE Magazine in February 1943. Courtesy of the Google-hosted LIFE archive.

During World War 2, New York dimmed its lights citywide to conserve energy. This is what the Statue of Liberty looks like when only her torch is alit.

Photo by Andreas Feininger for LIFE Magazine in February 1943. Courtesy of the Google-hosted LIFE archive.

August 30, 2012
Manhattan’s “El” train, on the 9th Avenue line, via LIFE magazine, Apr. 14, 1941. Photos by Andreas Feininger.

Manhattan’s “El” train, on the 9th Avenue line, via LIFE magazine, Apr. 14, 1941. Photos by Andreas Feininger.

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March 29, 2012
From this Reddit thread, titled: "My sister just moved to New York" 

From this Reddit thread, titled: "My sister just moved to New York" 

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Filed under: NYC subway gross life wtf 
January 13, 2012
"I do love to learn. It’s all I feel like I’m ever doing. It’s really the best you can do in life, is learn. You can’t really do anything right. You can just learn. Right now, I am learning to be a dad. I am learning how to take better care of myself and my kids. I”m learning how to communicate with people in my life."

— Louis C.K., in his Q&A on reddit last month, in response to the question: “I’ve noticed that you’re self-taught and hands-on in many facets of production (cameras, self-editing, etc.)…What are you currently learning, or what else would you like to master in the future?

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Filed under: Louis C.K. questions life funny comedy